All posts tagged: rural

frontiermkts

Frontier Markets : Bringing Useful and Affordable Consumer Products to Rural India

The 4 billion poor around the world – people who live on less than $2 a day, have largely been viewed as weak and dependent on others for their survival. Frontier Markets wants to change all that forever. Charity organizations raise millions of dollars in donations ever year to provide free food, clothing and services to the poor and many a times unknowingly dictate how they should live and what they should eat. Rarely are the poor viewed as people with purchasing power who would need products that could help make their life easier and like us may need wide range of options to choose from. If today we want to buy a TV we go to a store where we have hundreds of brands, abundance of features and prices to choose from. In addition easy financing options available right in the store help us pay for the purchase. However on the other hand poor rarely have products that are designed for their lifestyle or that fit their budget. They’ve never been considered as serious …

Lifespring 2

Lifespring Hospitals : Quality Maternity Care at Affordable Rates for the Poor

Lifespring Hospitals is a growing chain of private maternity hospitals providing high quality pre and post-natal care at affordable rates to India’s poor. Lifespring’s customers are low-income families (with an income of less than US$ 2-5/day) in urban and semi-urban areas. These families have traditionally had to choose between under-resourced government hospitals or expensive private hospitals – ultimately choosing to give birth at home without skilled assistance. Over 100,000 women die annually due to pregnancy-related complications, giving India the highest number of maternal deaths in the world. The hospital’s goal is to significantly increase hospital-supervised deliveries and reduce maternal and child mortality rates in the communities that it serves. The Lifespring Model The Lifespring model is focussed on building small hospitals (consisting of 20-25 beds) offering normal deliveries attended by private doctors for just $40. Cesarean sections are available for about $140. This is one-fifth the price offered by larger private hospitals. This is made possible by controlling the running costs of the hospital. First, there is no canteen. In addition, Lifespring outsources laboratory tests …

fishermen2

Culture Aangan Homestays : Promoting Rural Development via Tourism

Culture Aangan makes use of Cultural Tourism to create a sustainable livelihood for rural communities. Visitors to Culture Aangan home stay’s get a great, first hand look at village life in a rural setting. Rural communities are benefited from promoting cultural tourism by creation of economic opportunities that previously did not exist. Aangan, literally means “courtyard”. An Aangan has always been central to the life of a village family, as a space to meet, perform ceremonies, dry food and bond as a family. Culture Aangan adopts this concept to provide visitors with a first hand experience into rural life, yet ensuring that basic traveler comforts are met. The beginnings In May 2005, Culture Aangan founder, Rashmi Sawant began work on a project with the goal to connect city dwellers with life in the villages of rural India. The experience involved staying with a rural family and getting to know a way of life that is vastly different from city lifestyles. At the same time, travelers made a contribution to the local economy of the village. …

himjoli

Fairtrade to Reduce Migrations from Himalayas

A DNA India report recently warned that mass migration from rural to urban India would put immense pressure on urban infrastructure, leading to riots, price wars and other bad stuff. However all is not lost. Social ventures such as Himjoli are attempting to prevent that from happening. ‘Friends in the Land of Ice’ Himjoli was founded in 2009. They are a profitable social enterprise working with rural producers from the Kumaon region in the Indian Himalayas. Their mission: To create profitable, sustainable jobs in villages and reduce migration to cities. The rural communities of Kumaon traditionally produced enough for local consumption. Excess produce was sold in the local markets, where margins are small. Alternate sources of income have been tourism, usually providing seasonal earnings. Rising prices for essential commodities led to large scale migrations from villages in to cities such as Delhi and Mumbai, in the hope of finding work to make better wages and to support the families back home. The exodus naturally results in reduced development of local populations, and no improvement in …